Currently Browsing:Tree of the Month

Fringe Tree

(Chionanthus virginicus) In this time of turning back to native plants, you need look no further than this garden gem.  The Fringe Tree also called Old Man’s Beard, is named for its lacy threadlike flowers.  Few native trees give such a dependable, showy and fragrant flowering display year after year. The Fringe tree can be

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May Tree of The Month: Dawn Redwood

Dawn Redwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides) This tree was known and named only through fossils, as it was believed extinct for thousands of years. It was discovered alive in 1941 in Hueph, China and brought to America and distributed to arboretums and botanical gardens around the world in 1948 by the Arnold Arboretum. Since then, this beauty

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Arbor Day

In 1872, a Nebraska pioneer and journalist proposed a holiday for planting trees called “Arbor Day”.  J. Sterling Morton moved from Detroit only to find that the Nebraska territory was a vast treeless plain.  Recognizing the need for windbreaks, lumber, fuel wood and shade, he immediately started planting trees.  Morton became Secretary of the Nebraska

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Blue Colorado Spruce

(Picea pungens glauca) These trees naturally occur only in the Rocky Mountains region at elevations of 6000 to 10,000 feet.  Since the 1860’s, however, it has become a very popular and often over used specimen plant. Colorado Spruces come in every shade of green, gray and blue and can grow 25 feet wide by 120

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Eastern Red Cedar

(Juniperus virginiana) Although commonly called a cedar, it is actually a juniper. A native tree to every state east of the Mississippi River, it is perhaps the most adaptable of all evergreen species. They can tolerate salt, drought, heat, cold, and wind and even shed snow with little breakage. This species will grow in sand

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Cutleaf Japanese Maple

(Acer palmatum dissectum) A beautiful slow to medium growing plant that will eventually reach 8 to 14 feet in height and almost twice as wide.  Native to Japan, China and Korea, they are commonly planted in North America in USDA Hardiness Zones 5 to 8.  Used for centuries in Japanese gardens and for bonsai, they

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Paperbark Maple

(Acer griseum) An outstanding ornamental tree introduced from China in 1901, extremely slow growing, the Paperbark Maple almost never outgrows its space.  Small gardens and patios are ideal settings for this tree, as a good view of this tree in winter from your window is a great way to enjoy it.  Planted primarily for its

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Black Gum

Black Gum (Nyssa sylvatica) Pyramidal in habit when young, the Black Gum, Sour Gum, Pepperidge or Tupelo becomes a large spreading tree up to 90 feet tall and 45 feet wide in the wild, but usually half that when cultivated.  A native of the Eastern United States, Black Gum is typically found in moist rich

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Franklin Tree

(Franklinia alatamaha) Discovered in 1765 by the famous Philadelphia botanist, John Bartram, this tree has an interesting history. While on an expedition with his son William near the mouth of the Alatamaha River in Georgia, he discovered the tree growing on the sandy banks of the river.  He took several specimens home to his gardens

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Bald Cypress

Bald Cypress (Taxodium distichum) The botanical name Taxodium means “like a Yew”, and although their foliage is similar, that’s all they have in common. The Bald Cypress is native only to North America and is found growing in pure stands from Delaware to Florida.  The plants are quite hardy and are planted from USDA Zones

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