Mimosa (Albiza julibrissin)

The Mimosa or Silk-Tree, a native of South Asia, was introduced to North America in 1745, and has adapted well to a wide variety of conditions here in the U.S. It transplants easily and often seeds itself readily, sometimes to the point of being invasive in some areas. It survives a wide range of PH soils and withstands wind and drought. Cold snaps with prolonged periods of weather below freezing, however, will result in injury or death of the plant or parts of it.

Mimosa is a fast grower reaching 20 to 35 feet in height and sometimes wider. It is often multiple stemmed and has a vase shape with a flat top.

The bark is grayish brown and relatively smooth.Both the leaves and flowers have a feathery and tropical look to them adding to their allure in the north. The leaves emerge late in the spring, sometimes causing panic that the tree may have died. The pink bottle-brush like flowers emerge in June or July presenting a unique look in the northeastern U.S.